310 West 2nd Street
P.O. Box 5418
Thibodaux, LA 70302
985-446-7218
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 Departments Search Site  Features

Grants and Economic Development Department


310 West Second St.
P.O. Box 5418
Thibodaux, Louisiana 70302
Office: (985) 446-7606
Fax: (985) 493-8756
grants@ci.thibodaux.la.us

Luci Sposito, CLED, PCED - Director
  Thibodaux Grants and Economic Development  


Areas of Interest
Four stops are included in this tour of the Thibodaux area. Arrange to visit as many as your schedule permits. A shady picnic site is located on Bayou Lafourche, across from Nicholls State University, on Hwy. 1. Here you will find tables, grills, a dock over the bayou, and resident ducks, always looking for a handout. Alternatively, fast food is available on Hwy. 1 or Hwy. 20.
TRIP TITLE:

Sugarcane Farming Overview

CONTACT: American Sugar Cane League
206 E. Bayou Rd.
Thibodaux, LA 70301
(504) 448-3707
Allow 1-2 weeks advance notice.
CATEGORY: Sugar cane industry in Lafourche Parish
ENVIRONMENT: Office 
GROUP TYPE: Grades 5-12 and adult. Limit to 22 people.
TIME: Indoor 15-minute video presentation.
COST: Free
EQUIPMENT: None
DESCRIPTION:
Go to the American Sugar Cane League office to view a 15-minute film, "200 Years of Raisin' Cane," on the sugar cane industry. A media pack is also available from Louisiana State University. Call the Sugar Cane League for more information.

 

ACTIVITIES:

  • Following the video, ask the research specialist about soil erosion and its impact on sugarcane farming.
  • Discuss the impact of saltwater intrusion and land loss on the sugarcane industry.
  • Discuss problems with pesticides and fertilizers that wash from fields following heavy rains and enter bayous and canals. What impact do they have on the waterways? What changes have been made to control these occurrences?
  • Discuss crop dusting and its impact on non-crop vegetation and waterways.

TRIP TITLE:

Laurel Valley Village
CONTACT: Laurel Valley Village/Plantation Museum and Country Store
595 Hwy. 308
Thibodaux, LA 70301
(504) 447-2902 to arrange tours
(504) 446-7456 -Country Store


Store Hours: Tuesday-Friday,
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Closed Mondays
Saturday and Sunday, 12:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

CATEGORY: Guided or self-guided. Cultural/historical and agricultural.
ENVIRONMENT: Historic village and plantation within a modern sugar cane farm.
GROUP TYPE: K-12 and adult.
TIME: Guided tour of village lasts 45 minutes for older students, less time for younger. Allow an additional 1/2 hour or more for museum/country store and grounds. Only ten students are allowed in the store at a time.
COST: Self-guided tour is free. A tour with a Nicholls State University History Professor is $.25 - $1.25 per student, depending on age. Adult rate is $3.00. Minimum of 10 persons for a guided tour.
DISTANCE: Six miles southeast of Thibodaux on Hwy. 308.

DESCRIPTION:

Located in the center of Laurel Valley Plantation on Bayou Lafourche, it is the site of the largest, most intact remaining turn-of-the-century sugar plantation complex in the southern United States. In the village, the visitor will drive past rows of century-old faded cypress tenant houses, the remains of the giant sugar mill, the two-story boarding house for migrant workers, and the one-room schoolhouse and more. Because the village buildings have not yet been restored, visitors may view them from outside only.

The museum/country store area offers local crafts, and a museum of farm implements and other relics. Outside, visitors may view an array of antique tractors and also several train engines. A recent addition to Laurel Valley is the boat builder's shop, where visitors can watch craftsmen work on the construction of a cypress boat.

ACTIVITIES:

  • Go to the American Sugar Cane League office on Hwy. 308 for the video presentation before you visit Laurel Valley.

  • Take the guided oi>Take the guided or self-guided tour of the village. Notice the sugar cane fields on either side of the road. Determine the stage of planting or growth of the cane in the fields.

  • Purchase corn at the country store and feed the farm animals.

  • Cross Bayou Lafourche at the first bridge northwest (towards Thibodaux).  Travel 1-2 miles up Hwy. 1 to Nicholls State University. Park on the road shoulder across from Nicholls (by the fountain) and picnic at shady tables along the bayou. Bring extra bread to feed the ducks

 

TRIP TITLE:

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park & Preserve Wetlands Acadian Cultural Center

CONTACT: Jean Lafitte National Historical Park & Preserve
Wetlands Acadian Cultural Center
Jean Lafitte Acadian Cultural Center
(National Park Service)
Park Ranger
314 St. Mary St.
Thibodaux, LA 70301
(504) 448-1425
CATEGORY: Guided. Cultural/Historical, as influenced by the south Louisiana environment. Allow 3-4 weeks advance notice for regular program, more if you want a program created to meet your needs.
ENVIRONMENT: Indoor cultural center on Bayou Lafourche.
Outdoor walkway along bayou.
GROUP TYPE: Pre-K through adult
TIME: 1 1/2 - 2 hours or more, depending on age of students and scope of activities.
COST: Free.
DISTANCE: Located in downtown Thibodaux.

DESCRIPTION:
The Wetlands Acadian Cultural Center offers guided programs using age-appropried programs using age-appropriate materials which are tied to the State curriculum. Pre-visit and post-visit activities and curriculum provide an introduction and a follow-up to your visit. The theme of the program is the Acadian people and the other diverse cultural groups that have settled in Louisiana. Programs on other cultural topics such as: transportation route evolution and how the South Louisiana natural environment molded the culture of its inhabitants may be requested. Rangers are willing to work with teachers on a topic of their choice to create a meaningful program.

* Note: The more elaborate a program you want, the more advance notice you need to give.

Occasionally, special events, such as Native American Day are offered. This particular event includes demonstrations of native American dance and crafts, with plenty of access to native Americans for questions. To learn about these events, call the center monthly. Your principal's office may request that your school be on the mailing list to be notified of upcoming events. Funds for mailing are limited, so be sure that interest is sincere.

After the program, picnic on Bayou Lafourche at shady tables across from Nicholls State University or lunch at various restaurants and fast food stops.

 

 
 
 
   
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